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Head flick in the International Tango
Posted by docco
7/28/2014  10:47:00 PM
The head flick technique in the International tango dance is very important.
I want to know something more about it:
1. When you do head flick - in term of choreography?
2. When you do head flick - in term of musicallity?
3. Is there any limit for head flick in a dance? (min/max of head flick times)

Thanks & hope to receive a lot of susgestion from pro
Re: Head flick in the International Tango
Posted by Waltz123
8/7/2014  12:41:00 AM
1. When you do head flick - in term of choreography?
2. When you do head flick - in term of musicality?

A "head flick" can mean a number of things, so it's probably best to clarify exactly what action you're thinking of. Any quick turn of the head might be described as a head flick, which can include everything from a simple turn to promenade position, to a Spanish Drag with an elaborate combination of multiple turns of the lady's head back and forth.

If you're thinking more broadly and generically, then a "head flick" is can be thought of simply as a quick turning of the head, typically, but not necessarily from closed position to promenade, or vice-versa. In this case it is nothing more than an interpretation of an action that is already present in many basic figures such as the Link, Closed Promenade, Closed or Open Finish ended in PP, Outside Swivels, and so forth. Specifically, the interpretation is one that is both "sudden" (i.e. occupying as little time as possible) and "bound" (i.e. movement that is contained by way of increased muscle tone).

Please note that the concept of "sudden" movement, while it does imply quickness, does not necessarily relate to the timing. You can, for example, have a turn to promenade that is meant to take place over the course of two beats, or one "slow" count, and still interpret it in many different ways. To illustrate a movement that is sudden, you would do it as quickly as possible, say at the very beginning of the first beat, taking as little time as possible to complete it, and then waiting through the remainder of the two-beats -- This is still considered a "slow" from the standpoint of musical timing, even though the movement itself is sudden. Compare that to the opposite interpretation, one that is "sustained", where you would use the entire span of two beats to complete the turning to promenade.

This is an important distinction because it illustrates how you can be prescribed a certain timing, say for example QQ for a link, or SQQS for Closed Promenade, and still interpret the turning of the head in various ways: sudden and bound, or more gradual and relaxed, or perhaps somewhere in between. The "flicking" of the head, then, would be the appearance of quickness and bound-ness when turning from one position to another.

If you have something more specific in mind, let us know and we'll try to figure out what it is. Chances are good, all of the information above will apply. A very popular movement you might be thinking of when you say "flick" is one where a couple, already in promenade, will turn briefly to closed position and immediately back to promenade, all while standing in place. I've heard it called a Shrug, but it might go by other names as well. It is often done to the counts, "and slow", tacked on to the end of another figure, to complete the last two beats of a musical phrase. For example, if you have something that ends in promenade on counts 5,6, (e.g. two walks and a link), and you don't want to sit stationary through 7,8 to start the next movement on the next count 1, you could fill the time with the extra head flick on &7 (hold8).

3. Is there any limit for head flick in a dance? (min/max of head flick times)

As with anything in dancing (and in life for that matter), most things are best in moderation. There are no absolute rules, but you don't want to go crazy with any one action any more than you would with any one step or pattern. So, just like you do with your choice of choreography, just remember with your artistic interpretation to keep things interesting. Mix your suddens with sustains, look for opportunities to execute actions both bound and free, and try to do it in ways that emphasize the character of Tango. Remember that Tango is not all "attack"... There's all the time you spend working up to it, while stalking, slithering, pursuing, seducing, etc.

Regards,
Jonathan
Re: Head flick in the International Tango
Posted by nloftofan1
8/7/2014  7:31:00 AM
'A very popular movement you might be thinking of when you say "flick" is one where a couple, already in promenade, will turn briefly to closed position and immediately back to promenade, all while standing in place. I've heard it called a Shrug, but it might go by other names as well.'

One of our favorite instructors used to call this a "body fan." I should also add that he was notorious among his friends in the dance instructor community for using nonstandard terminology.
Re: Head flick in the International Tango
Posted by O.K.
8/7/2014  11:13:00 PM
I think you will find that in the Rumba the shape by the man is like a Fan opening as he places the lady into the Fan Position. Never heard that name used in a Tango.
Re: Head flick in the International Tango
Posted by socialdancer
8/8/2014  10:11:00 AM
Nothing to do with latin fan position.
The fan action is described by Geoffrey Hearn in "A Technique Of Advanced Standard Ballroom Figures". Also sometimes referred to as "In and Out" or "Extended Promenade" it does travel so the feet are involved. From that, a variant without use of the feet could reasonably be called a body fan.

I don't think the action warrants a name in its own right but Shrug or Twitch would work for me. Whatever the couple can remember and associate with the action.

The most memorable term I have heard used, based on the impression of taking a quick glance over the shoulder, was "What was that Vicar?"
Re: Head flick in the International Tango
Posted by O.K.
8/8/2014  6:38:00 PM
Socialdancer. I don't think that to use the word Shrug for any dance would be wise. Shrug would mean lifting the shoulders and lowering. This we don't do. And on a lady would look awful. In dancing we try to keep our shoulders down. As I said before the lifting of the shoulders should not happen in any dance style. Bad choice of a word there. In the hands of a beginner not to be recommended.
Re: Head flick in the International Tango
Posted by nloftofan1
8/11/2014  8:28:00 AM
"Never heard that name used in a Tango." In American style Tango, a "fan" is an outside swivel (just one more example of using the same word to mean something different; another example--a spot turn means something very different in American style Latin dances than it means in International style). I think that's what this particular instructor was thinking of when he called that movement a "body fan."
Re: Head flick in the International Tango
Posted by O.Z
8/7/2014  11:38:00 PM
If the International Tango at the completion of the Progressive Link The outside of the Ladies right knee is touching the inside of the Mans left . And the inside of the Ladies left knee should be touching the outside of the mans right knee. Its not likely that the position of the of the legs and feet will alter. Just turn the heads for the man right then left. Lady the opposite. Now we step each one floorboard wide, or enough so that the lady can step slightly behind the man without distorting the shape into the Closed Promenade
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